Here you can find those Frequently Asked Questions that we get on a regular basis. Don't see your question? Submit it, and maybe it'll appear here!

ARE GUITAR BOOMERS AVAILABLE WITH A WOUND 3RD STRING?

They are! If you click here, you can see our available sets that have a wound 3rd string. If you don't find the gauges you prefer in those sets, you can always make a custom set through one of our online dealers, or through our online store

WHAT GUITAR STRINGS HAVE MORE TENSION: BRITE FLATS, PRECISION FLATWOUNDS OR BOOMERS?

We compared a set of Brite Flats 720 (11-50) with Precision Flats 800 (11-46) and Guitar Boomers GBM (11-50) to find out the tension differences; the numbers are below: 

  • Brite Flats set 720 - 11, 14, 22, 28, 38, 50 - 145.8lbs total
  • Precision Flatwound set 800 - 11, 14, 22, 28, 36, 46 - 125.6lbs total
  • Boomers set GBM - 11, 15, 18, 26, 36, 50 - 120.8lbs total 

Brite Flats have the most total tension, which is due to how they are constructed. Since they start out as roundwounds that are then ground smooth, the unfinished string will be a larger gauge than the final, yielding a string with a heavier core wire. This will also be the prime reason that a set of Brite Flats will feel stiffer under the fingers, when compared to other strings. 

WHAT SET OF ELECTRIC GUITAR STRINGS HAVE MORE TENSION THAN A 11-50 BUT LESS TENSION THAN A 12-52?

if we're talking tension in terms of the amount of force that a string, when tuned to pitch, exerts on a guitar neck, you're going to be hard pressed to find a packaged set; the 11-50 set has a total tension of approx. 121lbs, and the 12-52 set has a total of approx. 130lbs. The closest you could get would be our Boomers True Medium set, which has a tension of around 124lbs, so that would technically fit your description.

If you're talking about tension in terms of flexibility and feel, we'd recommend that you take a look at our Thin Core Boomers and Thick Core Boomers. Both of which have tweaked core diameters which, depending on your wants/needs, should fit the bill nicely. 

WHAT GUITAR SET WILL RETAIN MOST OF THE SONICS OF BOOMERS WHILE ALLOWING A LITTLE QUIETER FINGERTIP SLIDING?

Any time you want a set of strings that has less finger noise (but aren't willing to go to groundwound or flatwound), you need to look for a set that is either burnished or rollerwound. The good news is that burnishing/rollerwinding the strings results in less finger noise. The bad news is the these processes make for a mellower string. In this instance, our Burnished Nickel Rockers would be the closest that we currently offer to a set of guitar strings that retain the tonal characteristics of Boomers without the noise. There will still be a difference, but tonally they are very close. 

Is 016 018 026 DY40 DY50 DY58 good for a lap steel with open g tuning?

Since we released our bass string tension chart last year, we've gotten a lot of favorable responses and accolades. Know that we're working on the guitar string tension chart, and hope to have that available, at which point you can figure this out. In the meantime...

With those gauges and your tuning (G-B-D-G-B-D), the 2nd and 5th string are going to be the odd ones out on the set. To even out the tension and feel, I would recommend doing 016 019 026 DY40 DY48 DY58, however that's pulling on average around 42lbs per string. 

I'd recommend going 016 018 022 DY34 DY44 DY52, which will put closer to an average of 29lbs per string on your lap steel, closer to what a set of 13s would do at standard tuning.

ARE GUITAR BOOMERS WOUND OVER A ROUND OR HEX CORE, AND WHY?

The bulk of the Guitar Boomers are wound over a round core, with exceptions being any wound Boomer at .024 or smaller, or .060 and higher. 

As to why, there are many benefits of a round core. Comparatively, round core strings have a greater flexibility than hex core strings, and also have a slightly warmer tone. However, round core strings need larger core wire diameters to equal the same amount of stability and strength as hex. 

Hex cores are able to remain stable at smaller diameters (which is why you'll notice we use hex on the .024 or smaller Boomer gauges). Compared to round core strings, hex strings have a slightly tighter attack and brighter tone. Also, as string gauges get thicker, the added stability that the hex core provides makes it ideal to retain clarity and definition on lower strings, specifically the B and F# strings found in our 7 String Boomers and 8 String Boomers

WHAT ARE THE DIFFERENCES IN PLAIN STRINGS?

With small exception (that being the plain strings in the Infinity Bronze and Signature Bronze sets), we use the same plain steel strings in all of our guitar sets. So, that 009 string you have in your set of Guitar Boomers is the same 009 used in a set of Nickel RockersBright Bronze, etc..